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Minimum wage laws and the law of unintended consequences

Minimum wage laws and the law of unintended consequences

Recently, I attended the candidate forum hosted by the League of Women Voters in Charles Town. Although in all likelihood there are few, if any, new votes to be had there by the candidates, the forum has value in that it provides a venue for citizens to learn about issues. On more than one occasion […]

The Boston Tea Party? Planned in a coffee house

A coffee problem? Only when I can’t get a cup . . . One to wake up    One for the road.     One for motivation.     And one for a reward.  It’s easy to plan an entire day of tasks using coffee as fuel. And just living from cup to cup is a kind […]

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‘Doesn’t it make sense that a farm would need a farmer?’

Editor’s note: The author of the acclaimed 2013 book “Gaining Ground: A Story of Farmers’ Markets, Local Food and Saving the Family Farm” is set to be the featured guest at the Charles Town Farmers Market on South Samuel Street Saturday morning. This article is exclusive, use Cleeng to view it in full. The rest […]

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Steamed or creamed, asparagus deserves a spot on your spring table

KEARNEYSVILLE – Asparagus is a vegetable left off many dinner tables. Many youngsters – and some adults, too – will curl up their noses at its mention. But this vegetable is high in Vitamin B6 and C and offers fiber, making it an excellent choice for a healthy, delicious side dish. I t comes in […]

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Voter IDs suppress election fraud — not the vote

In my previous column I referred to an organization called True the Vote. Its president, Catherine Engelbrecht, recently testified at a congressional hearing looking into allegations that the Internal Revenue Service inappropriately targeted groups based on their political views. True the Vote, one of the organizations allegedly targeted by the IRS, was founded by Engelbrecht […]

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Old things and new on the year’s first trip to North River Mills

Like the recent installment about my drive to Middleburg, I’m chronicling the year’s first day back at one of my more or less seasonal activities. I like to make them sound like Civil War battles because both locations are dripping with history of the period — you can almost step in it. The North River […]

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Apparently, we have two very hip commodes in our house. One is powder blue, the other a sunny yellow. Late ‘60s or early-70s vintage, they are – original equipment. This heavy-duty plumbing is “coming back,” as they say. You know you’re of a certain age when many of the things you’ve owned for years are […]

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Why do I Relay?

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Why do I Relay?

Why do I relay? Because cancer never sleeps, relays are overnight events up to 24 hours in length. This gives participants an opportunity to celebrate, remember and fight back against cancer. Shepherd University will hold its Relay for Life on Friday, beginning at 6 p.m. through 6 a.m. on Saturday morning in the Wellness Center, […]

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What to do with our ‘too big to’ be accountable government

I was involved in a discussion with a friend the other day about the proper role of government. Particularly with regard to markets. It quickly devolved into the usual memes. I believe in free markets and he, well, doesn’t. Finally, he came out and said it: “The role of government is to hold the private […]

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Sales tax hike: Balancing the budget on the backs of West Virginians

As I stated previously, some of the best things that happen in Charleston are things that don’t happen. A prime example was House Bill 4456, introduced by Delegate Jim Morgan, a Democrat from Cabell County. Faced with a state budget shortfall, Morgan’s legislation proposed raising the West Virginia state sales tax 1 percent from 6 […]

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