Get jammin’

The Wailers bring the legacy of Bob Marley to Charles Town

 

CHARLES TOWN — Since Bob Marley formed the Wailers in the mid-1960s, the band has gone on to sell more than 250 million albums.

[cleeng_content id="479058350" description="Read it now!" price="0.49" t="article"]

T: The Wailers return to Charles Town Sunday, bringing along the instantly recognizable sound of reggae music, the genre the musicians have made famous around the world.

The Wailers return to Charles Town Sunday, bringing
along the instantly recognizable sound of reggae music, the
genre the musicians have made famous around the world.

And its popularity continues to grow.

On Sunday, the band, which has been led by Dwayne “Danglin” Anglin since 2010, will return to the H Lounge in Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races. The band last performed in Charles Town in 2012.

Before lead singer and guitarist Marley died of cancer in 1981 at age 36, he wrote a number of hits, including “I Shot the Sheriff,” “Redemption Song,” “Jamming” and “No Woman, No Cry,” which are all still radio staples.

In a phone interview from San Francisco, Anglin said he understands why the band continues to resonate around the world.

“It’s no surprise, the reason the music was relevant then is the same reason it is relevant now, because there is a great need for it as long as there is injustice and inequality in the world,” he said. “This kind of music will always be relevant because this is what we speak against. We want to promote a feeling of positive energy, positive vibrations.”

Anglin said reggae music possesses a unique sound and message of reggae music. “Family Man (original Wailers bassist Aston Barrett) always says reggae music is the heartbeat of the people. Without your heartbeat, you cannot stay alive. That is the whole essence of reggae music,” Anglin said. “It is on the upbeat, which is significant because it stands out from all other genres of music. The message is very relevant to uplifting and motivating people. Reggae is one of those things that people need. We are privileged to be the ambassadors that carry on the Wailers music.”

The responsibility of filling the shoes of someone so famous as Bob Marley would be a daunting task for most people. Anglin takes it all in stride. “It’s a great responsibility, but it’s countered and made easy by the love that the people have for the music, so it’s not like work, the work is halfway done. We are carrying on the foundation that was laid,” Anglin said.

Aston “Family Man” Barrett’s syncopated, melodic bass lines will be the foundation for the Wailers’ Sunday performance.

Aston “Family Man” Barrett’s syncopated, melodic
bass lines will be the foundation for the Wailers’ Sunday performance.

One way the band carries the legacy of Marley is through its participation in the U.N. World Food Programme. The programm is the world’s largest organization fighting hunger globally and is committed to getting food to where it is needed, and saving the lives of victims of war, civil conflict and natural disasters. The band joined the program in 2008 and has been proactive by recording tracks for the Oniric Records’ “Solutions for Dreamers: Season 3” compilation album in 2010 with all proceeds going to the program. The Wailers try to do their part to create a better tomorrow for the people of the world and encourage all to do the same, Anglin said.

Anglin has a simple message for the people. “Stay positive. That’s how I take everything, one day at a time with a positive attitude.”

[/cleeng_content]

Share This Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>